Involuntary orgasim-Anorgasmia in women - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

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Involuntary orgasim

Involuntary orgasim

Involuntary orgasim

Involuntary orgasim Female. And during orgasm, activity decreased in other brain areas, too. This device, commonly used to treat back pain, Involuntary orgasim small pulses of electricity into the base of the spinal column. Leiblum, S. Carpenter, M.

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We will provide notice if orgasmi become Neud swim suit models of any security breach that Involuntwry affect Involuntary orgasim sensitive personal information pertaining to you that we have stored on our systems. Sexual Behavior: Problems and Management. Some of our websites also use third-party advertising companies to serve ads when you visit. Cleis Press. Temple University Press. Carroll Journal of Sex Research. They got it all wrong: Why the PSA test is imperative for saving lives from prostate cancer. These individuals are bound by confidentiality obligations and may be subject to discipline, including termination and criminal prosecution, if they fail to meet these obligations. Transfers of personally-identifying information may Involuntary orgasim be made where necessary for the establishment, exercise, or defense of Involuntary orgasim claims.

But PGAD actually has very little to do with orgasms, and absolutely nothing to do with pleasure.

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They are often associated with other involuntary actions, including muscular spasms in multiple areas of the body, a general euphoric sensation and, frequently, body movements and vocalizations. Human orgasms usually result from physical sexual stimulation of the penis in males typically accompanying ejaculation and of the clitoris in females. The health effects surrounding the human orgasm are diverse. There are many physiological responses during sexual activity, including a relaxed state created by prolactin, as well as changes in the central nervous system such as a temporary decrease in the metabolic activity of large parts of the cerebral cortex while there is no change or increased metabolic activity in the limbic i.

In a clinical context, orgasm is usually defined strictly by the muscular contractions involved during sexual activity, along with the characteristic patterns of change in heart rate, blood pressure, and often respiration rate and depth.

There is some debate whether certain types of sexual sensations should be accurately classified as orgasms, including female orgasms caused by G-spot stimulation alone, and the demonstration of extended or continuous orgasms lasting several minutes or even an hour.

However, the sensations in both sexes are extremely pleasurable and are often felt throughout the body, causing a mental state that is often described as transcendental, and with vasocongestion and associated pleasure comparable to that of a full-contractionary orgasm. For example, modern findings support distinction between ejaculation and male orgasm.

Orgasms can be achieved during a variety of activities, including vaginal , anal or oral sex , non-penetrative sex or masturbation. They may also be achieved by the use of a sex toy , such as a sensual vibrator or an erotic electrostimulation. Achieving orgasm by stimulation of the nipples or other erogenous zones is rarer. In addition to physical stimulation, orgasm can be achieved from psychological arousal alone, such as during dreaming nocturnal emission for males or females [12] [14] [18] or by forced orgasm.

Orgasm by psychological stimulation alone was first reported among people who had spinal cord injury. A person may also experience an involuntary orgasm , such as in the case of rape or other sexual assault. In one controlled study by Vance and Wagner , independent raters could not differentiate written descriptions of male versus female orgasm experiences".

The refractory period is the recovery phase after orgasm during which it is physiologically impossible for a man to have additional orgasms. Masters and Johnson equated male orgasm and ejaculation and maintained the necessity for a refractory period between orgasms.

There has been little scientific study of multiple orgasm in men. An increased infusion of the hormone oxytocin during ejaculation is believed to be chiefly responsible for the refractory period, and the amount by which oxytocin is increased may affect the length of each refractory period. During the study, six fully ejaculatory orgasms were experienced in 36 minutes, with no apparent refractory period. One misconception, particularly in older research publications, is that the vagina is completely insensitive.

Masters and Johnson argued that all women are potentially multiply orgasmic, but that multiply orgasmic men are rare, and stated that "the female is capable of rapid return to orgasm immediately following an orgasmic experience, if restimulated before tensions have dropped below plateau phase response levels".

Discussions of female orgasm are complicated by orgasms in women typically being divided into two categories: clitoral orgasm and vaginal or G-spot orgasm. In , Freud stated that clitoral orgasms are purely an adolescent phenomenon and that upon reaching puberty, the proper response of mature women is a change-over to vaginal orgasms, meaning orgasms without any clitoral stimulation. While Freud provided no evidence for this basic assumption, the consequences of this theory were considerable. Many women felt inadequate when they could not achieve orgasm via vaginal intercourse alone, involving little or no clitoral stimulation, as Freud's theory made penile-vaginal intercourse the central component to women's sexual satisfaction.

The first major national surveys of sexual behavior were the Kinsey Reports. He "concluded that satisfaction from penile penetration [is] mainly psychological or perhaps the result of referred sensation". Masters and Johnson's research into the female sexual response cycle , as well as Shere Hite 's, generally supported Kinsey's findings about female orgasm.

Accounts that the vagina is capable of producing orgasms continue to be subject to debate because, in addition to the vagina's low concentration of nerve endings, reports of the G-spot's location are inconsistent—it appears to be nonexistent in some women and may be an extension of another structure, such as the Skene's gland or the clitoris, which is a part of the Skene's gland. Possible explanations for the G-spot were examined by Masters and Johnson, who were the first researchers to determine that the clitoral structures surround and extend along and within the labia.

On this basis, they argued that clitoral stimulation is the source of both kinds of orgasms, [59] [60] reasoning that the clitoris is stimulated during penetration by friction against its hood; their notion that this provides the clitoris with sufficient sexual stimulation has been criticized by researchers such as Elisabeth Lloyd. Australian urologist Helen O'Connell's research additionally indicates a connection between orgasms experienced vaginally and the clitoris, suggesting that clitoral tissue extends into the anterior wall of the vagina and that therefore clitoral and vaginal orgasms are of the same origin.

Having used MRI technology which enabled her to note a direct relationship between the legs or roots of the clitoris and the erectile tissue of the "clitoral bulbs" and corpora, and the distal urethra and vagina, she stated that the vaginal wall is the clitoris; that lifting the skin off the vagina on the side walls reveals the bulbs of the clitoris—triangular, crescental masses of erectile tissue. In , they published the first complete 3D sonography of the stimulated clitoris, and republished it in with new research, demonstrating the ways in which erectile tissue of the clitoris engorges and surrounds the vagina, arguing that women may be able to achieve vaginal orgasm via stimulation of the G-spot because the highly innervated clitoris is pulled closely to the anterior wall of the vagina when the woman is sexually aroused and during vaginal penetration.

They assert that since the front wall of the vagina is inextricably linked with the internal parts of the clitoris, stimulating the vagina without activating the clitoris may be next to impossible.

It's a region, it's a convergence of many different structures. Scholars state "many couples are locked into the idea that orgasms should be achieved only through intercourse [vaginal sex]" and that "[e]ven the word foreplay suggests that any other form of sexual stimulation is merely preparation for the 'main event.

In the first large-scale empirical study worldwide to link specific practices with orgasm, reported in the Journal of Sex Research in , demographic and sexual history variables were comparatively weakly associated with orgasm.

Data was analyzed from the Australian Study of Health and Relationships, a national telephone survey of sexual behavior and attitudes and sexual health knowledge carried out in —, with a representative sample of 19, Australians aged 16 to Kinsey, in his book Sexual Behavior in the Human Female , stated that exercise could bring about sexual pleasure, including orgasm. In both sexes, pleasure can be derived from the nerve endings around the anus and the anus itself, such as during anal sex.

It is possible for men to achieve orgasms through prostate stimulation alone. It is also typical for a man to not reach orgasm as a receptive partner solely from anal sex. For women, penile-anal penetration may also indirectly stimulate the clitoris by the shared sensory nerves, especially the pudendal nerve , which gives off the inferior anal nerves and divides into the perineal nerve and the dorsal nerve of the clitoris. The aforementioned orgasms are sometimes referred to as anal orgasms, [86] [87] but sexologists and sex educators generally believe that orgasms derived from anal penetration are the result of the relationship between the nerves of the anus, rectum, clitoris or G-spot area in women, and the anus's proximity to the prostate and relationship between the anal and rectal nerves in men, rather than orgasms originating from the anus itself.

For women, stimulation of the breast area during sexual intercourse or foreplay , or solely having the breasts fondled, can create mild to intense orgasms, sometimes referred to as a breast orgasm or nipple orgasm.

An orgasm is believed to occur in part because of the hormone oxytocin , which is produced in the body during sexual excitement and arousal and labor. It has also been shown that oxytocin is produced when a man or woman's nipples are stimulated and become erect.

Masters and Johnson were some of the first researchers to study the sexual response cycle in the early s, based on the observation of women and men. They described a cycle that begins with excitement as blood rushes into the genitals, then reaches a plateau during which they are fully aroused, which leads to orgasm, and finally resolution, in which the blood leaves the genitals. She stated that emotions of anxiety, defensiveness and the failure of communication can interfere with desire and orgasm.

As a man nears orgasm during stimulation of the penis, he feels an intense and highly pleasurable pulsating sensation of neuromuscular euphoria. These pulses are a series of throbbing sensations of the bulbospongiosus muscles that begin in the anal sphincter and travel to the tip of the penis.

They eventually increase in speed and intensity as the orgasm approaches, until a final "plateau" the orgasmic pleasure sustained for several seconds.

During orgasm, a human male experiences rapid, rhythmic contractions of the anal sphincter , the prostate, and the muscles of the penis. The sperm are transmitted up the vas deferens from the testicles , into the prostate gland as well as through the seminal vesicles to produce what is known as semen. Except for in cases of a dry orgasm, contraction of the sphincter and prostate force stored semen to be expelled through the penis's urethral opening.

The process takes from three to ten seconds, and produces a pleasurable feeling. It is believed that the exact feeling of "orgasm" varies from one man to another. This does not normally affect the intensity of pleasure, but merely shortens the duration.

After ejaculation, a refractory period usually occurs, during which a man cannot achieve another orgasm. This can last anywhere from less than a minute to several hours or days, depending on age and other individual factors. A woman's orgasm may last slightly longer or much longer than a man's. In some instances, the series of regular contractions is followed by a few additional contractions or shudders at irregular intervals. Women's orgasms are preceded by erection of the clitoris and moistening of the opening of the vagina.

Some women exhibit a sex flush , a reddening of the skin over much of the body due to increased blood flow to the skin. As a woman nears orgasm, the clitoral glans retracts under the clitoral hood , and the labia minora inner lips become darker. As orgasm becomes imminent, the outer third of the vagina tightens and narrows, while overall the vagina lengthens and dilates and also becomes congested from engorged soft tissue.

Elsewhere in the body, myofibroblasts of the nipple- areolar complex contract, causing erection of the nipples and contraction of the areolar diameter, reaching their maximum at the start of orgasm.

They found that using this metric they could distinguish from rest, voluntary muscular contractions, and even unsuccessful orgasm attempts. Since ancient times in Western Europe, women could be medically diagnosed with a disorder called female hysteria , the symptoms of which included faintness, nervousness, insomnia, fluid retention, heaviness in abdomen, muscle spasm, shortness of breath, irritability, loss of appetite for food or sex, and "a tendency to cause trouble".

Paroxysm was regarded as a medical treatment, and not a sexual release. There have been very few studies correlating orgasm and brain activity in real time. One study examined 12 healthy women using a positron emission tomography PET scanner while they were being stimulated by their partners. Brain changes were observed and compared between states of rest, sexual stimulation, faked orgasm, and actual orgasm. Differences were reported in the brains of men and women during stimulation.

However, changes in brain activity were observed in both sexes in which the brain regions associated with behavioral control, fear and anxiety shut down. While stroking the clitoris, the parts of the female brain responsible for processing fear, anxiety and behavioral control start to diminish in activity. Holstege is quoted as saying, at the meeting of the European Society for Human Reproduction and Development: "At the moment of orgasm, women do not have any emotional feelings.

Initial reports indicated that it was difficult to observe the effects of orgasm on men using PET scans, because the duration of the male orgasm was shorter.

However, a subsequent report by Rudie Kortekaas, et al. Research has shown that as in women, the emotional centers of a man's brain also become deactivated during orgasm but to a lesser extent than in women. Human brain wave patterns show distinct changes during orgasm, which indicate the importance of the limbic system in the orgasmic response.

EEG tracings from volunteers during orgasm were first obtained by Mosovich and Tallaferro in Further studies in this direction were carried out by Sem-Jacobsen , Heath , Cohen et al. These reports continue to be cited. In some recent studies, authors tend to adopt the opposite point of view that there are no remarkable EEG changes during ejaculation in humans.

Orgasm, and sexual activity as a whole, are physical activities that can require exertion of many major bodily systems. Note that as a rule, correlation does not imply causation. There is some research suggesting that greater resting heart rate variability is associated with orgasms through penile-vaginal intercourse without additional simultaneous clitoral stimulation.

The symptoms last for up to a week. The inability to have orgasm, or regular difficulty reaching orgasm after ample sexual stimulation, is called anorgasmia or inorgasmia. Blair , published in the Journal of Sex Research , found that women in same-sex relationships enjoyed identical sexual desire, sexual communication, sexual satisfaction, and satisfaction with orgasm as their heterosexual counterparts.

Specifically in relation to simultaneous orgasm and similar practices, many sexologists claim that the problem of premature ejaculation [] is closely related to the idea encouraged by a scientific approach in the early 20th century when mutual orgasm was overly emphasized as an objective and a sign of true sexual satisfaction in intimate relationships.

If orgasm is desired, anorgasmia may be attributed to an inability to relax. It may be associated with performance pressure and an unwillingness to pursue pleasure, as separate from the other person's satisfaction; often, women worry so much about the pleasure of their partner that they become anxious, which manifests as impatience with the delay of orgasm for them.

This delay can lead to frustration of not reaching orgasmic sexual satisfaction. Although orgasm dysfunction can have psychological components, physiological factors often play a role.

Indiana University Press. This does not normally affect the intensity of pleasure, but merely shortens the duration. When you visit our websites, we and our third-party partners send cookies — small, removable data files — to your computer. Retrieved July 5, Before we share your sensitive personal information outside of the previously listed circumstances, we will ask you for permission first. Obviously, this happens because the baby stimulates the same areas of the vagina that would normally be stimulated for an orgasm.

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Involuntary orgasim

Involuntary orgasim